CNY Orthopedic Sports Medicine, PC: Product

Product Considerations
 

 

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Assistance/AidsDrugsHot/Cold
PillowShoesStrength
Supports and Braces  

Assistance/Aids

Hip Kits
Hip Kits were designed to help people who have difficulty dressing, bathing, and performing routine activities of daily living. People who suffer from arthritis of the hip, have fractured their hip, have back pain or have undergone surgery may have difficulty with these activities. Following surgery, it will take some time to regain strength and mobility. During this time, it may be necessary to use special techniques and tools to safely perform these activities. Before leaving the hospital, an occupational therapist will teach the patient how to shower, dress himself and prepare meals safely. A Hip Kit combines the items used to perform these tasks, so that it is easy to acquire them all from one place and at one time. The items are usually less expensive when purchased as a kit rather than individually.

A Hip Kit typically includes:

  • Reacher
  • Dressing Stick
  • Shoehorn
  • Contoured Scrub Sponge
  • Sock-Aid

  • Reachers
    Reachers were designed to help persons who have suffered an injury, undergone surgery or have a disability which results in difficulty bending over, stooping, or "reaching" common household items. This inability to perform activities of daily living may be temporary and a Reacher can help until you regain the ability to care for yourself without assistance. Reachers are available with many different features. A few are listed below and each person should determine his or her particular needs before choosing a Reacher.

  • Sideways opening jaws work well when picking up boxes from shelves or items with an open top, and allows the user to see the object while grasping it without twisting the wrist.
  • A palm-activated full hand trigger allows the full strength of the user's entire hand to close the jaw, unlike a conventional trigger that uses only a couple of fingers.
  • A comfortable pistol grip and rubber suction cups that can pick up anything from a coin to a 5 pound brick.
  • A design which features a magnet on the front tip for picking up small metal objects.
  • A patented SAF-T-LOK can maintain a secure grasp onto items with out constant tension on the trigger, or even holding the pistol grip.

  • Walkers
    Walkers were designed to help people who have difficulty walking due to an injury, a disability, or surgery to their hip, knee or ankle. When recovering from surgery, your physician may want you to gradually increase the amount of weight that is being placed on the injured extremity. By using a walker, you can transfer some of your body weight to the walker and off of the injured extremity. Walkers are available in different styles and heights. It is important to have your walker properly sized before purchasing.

    Drugs

    NSAIDs
    NSAIDs (Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs) are a group of drugs used to control pain. This category of medications includes both prescription and common over-the-counter painkillers such as ibuprofen. NSAIDs are effective for many types of pain that can occur because of inflammation of muscles, joints and bones. The drugs work quickly and people often notice some benefit within a few hours of taking the tablet. However, the complete effectiveness of the drug may not be realized for up to four weeks. For each individual, some varieties of NSAIDs are more effective than others. Often, patients will find that one or two varieties are helpful whereas others may not be as effective in controlling symptoms. It is usually necessary to try several brands and continue with the one that is most suitable. NSAIDs can be used to treat:
  • Pain resulting from inflammation or swelling.
  • Pain after injury.
  • Joint pain and arthritis.

  • Pain Medication
    NSAIDs (Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs) are a group of drugs used to control pain. This category of medications includes both prescription and common over-the-counter painkillers such as ibuprofen. NSAIDs are effective for many types of pain that can occur because of inflammation of muscles, joints and bones. The drugs work quickly and people often notice some benefit within a few hours of taking the tablet. However, the complete effectiveness of the drug may not be realized for up to four weeks. For each individual, some varieties of NSAIDs are more effective than others. Often, patients will find that one or two varieties are helpful whereas others may not be as effective in controlling symptoms. It is usually necessary to try several brands and continue with the one that is most suitable. NSAIDs can be used to treat:
  • Pain resulting from inflammation or swelling.
  • Pain after injury.
  • Joint pain and arthritis.
  • Hot/Cold

    Cold Therapy
    Cold therapy is used to reduce pain and swelling and is a convenient method to apply cold to an injured or rehabilitating extremity, such as a knee or shoulder. A cuff fits like a sleeve around the extremity and utilizes cold water supplied by a connected thermos or canister to chill the extremity. Water flow into the cuff can be controlled by different mechanisms. The simplest way is gravity; elevating the canister fills the cuff and controls the amount of pressure against the extremity. Water flow may also be controlled by a pump which will automatically circulate the cold water to and from the cuff. After surgery or immediately following an injury, the canister should be refilled with cold water every one to two hours to maintain a proper temperature. The cold therapy may also be used during rehabilitation, especially after physical activity, reducing the inflammatory heat from exercise.

    Cold therapy can be used to treat: Knee, Shoulder, Elbow, Wrist and Hand, Back, Hip, and Foot & Ankle Injuries.

    Hot/Cold Pack
    The use of hot and cold packs to relieve pain and inflammation is a common method of treatment for many conditions. When the soft tissue groups become strained or irritated the rotating application of hot and cold can be beneficial. Cold therapy numbs the nerves to reduce pain and combats swelling by constricting blood vessels and by slowing blood flow to the site of injury. The application of heat to an injury after a few days of cold therapy and after swelling and redness has been reduced promotes the healing process. Heat therapy speeds up healing by increasing the flow of blood to the site of injury. Heat will also restore flexibility, relieve muscle cramping, and arthritic symptoms.

    Knee: Cold Therapy
    Cold therapy is used to reduce pain and swelling and is a convenient method to apply cold to an injured or rehabilitating extremity, such as a knee or shoulder. A cuff fits like a sleeve around the extremity and utilizes cold water supplied by a connected thermos or canister to chill the extremity. Water flow into the cuff can be controlled by different mechanisms. The simplest way is gravity; elevating the canister fills the cuff and controls the amount of pressure against the extremity. Water flow may also be controlled by a pump which will automatically circulate the cold water to and from the cuff. After surgery or immediately following an injury, the canister should be refilled with cold water every one to two hours to maintain a proper temperature. The cold therapy may also be used during rehabilitation, especially after physical activity, reducing the inflammatory heat from exercise.

    Cold therapy can be used to treat: Knee, Shoulder, Elbow, Wrist and Hand, Back, Hip, and Foot & Ankle Injuries.

    Knee Examples include:

  • Pre-operative ACL/PCL injuries.
  • Non-surgical ACL/PCL injuries.
  • General knee pain or swelling.
  • Soft tissue injuries.

  • Pillow

    Abduction Pillow
    An abduction pillow is used to separate or hold a patient's leg apart at the thighs after total hip replacement or revision surgery. The pillow helps position the legs correctly to properly position the hip prosthesis in the hip joint; used after surgery, this device helps to reduce the likelihood of a dislocation after a hip replacement or revision procedure.

    The pillow is used immediately post-operatively, and is particularly important for maintaining an anatomically correct position while the patient rests and sleeps. As the muscles, tendons and ligaments gradually heal, the pillow will be used less frequently, until it is eventually discontinued.

    Shoes

    Fitting a Shoe
    Good shoes fit properly and provide cushion, support and durability that is both appropriate for your activity and for the structure of your particular feet. For example, if your feet have tendency toward pronation (turning in), then you need a firm outsole, a cushioned insole and a firm counter, the plastic cup that holds the heel in place. If you have rigid, sensitive feet, a soft midsole will feel best.

    Remember that feet expand when they bear weight; be sure the shoe isn't too short or narrow. When fitting your shoes, allow enough room in the toebox so you won't bruise your great toe while playing your sport.

    Whatever shoe you choose, try not to get too attached to any one pair. Jogging shoes lose 20 to 30 percent of their cushioning after 500 miles, and should probably be replaced long before then.

    Strength

    Exercise Bands
    Exercise Bands are resistance bands which provide both a positive and negative force on the muscles; improving strength, range of motion and conditioning of muscle groups.

    The bands are made from latex or a latex-like material and are color-coded based on the level of resistance they provide. The selected band easily attaches to a door where a wide range of strength training exercises can be preformed. The advantage of the wide band design is in the distribution of the resistive force upon the joints and muscles. Exercise Band therapy is highly effective in treating shoulder injuries where passive strength training is required and when specific muscle groups must be targeted. Shoulder muscles can be strengthened using the Exercise-Band without having to apply excess force to the actual shoulder joint.

    There are different brands of these exercise bands available. Examples include Thera-Band and Rep-Band. They are available individually or as a set.

    Grip Strengthening
    Grip-strengthening devices help work the muscles that flex the fingers. Some injuries require prolonged immobilization for healing. Once the hand is sufficiently healed and is ready to be moved, the muscles may have weakened and the hand may feel stiff. Grip-strengthening devices can gradually restore the hand's grasping and pinching strength. These devices require a squeezing motion against some form of resistance, typically an elastic band or spring. The resistance can often be adjusted as the hand gains strength. Some models also allow strengthening of individual fingers.

    Supports and Braces

    Ankle: Braces
    Ankle braces are often prescribed for ligament instability, tears, or sprains. The brace provides increased stability and may be used by patients suffering from ankle injuries or other chronic conditions. While walking or during other daily activity, the brace allows for normal movement of the ankle and foot. During athletic activity, the brace can also be worn to provide additional stability for the ankle, and can be comfortably worn with most varieties of shoes.

    The brace is typically sized to correspond to shoe size, yet some varieties fit to small, medium, or large dimensions. The two general types of braces are slip-on, or lace-up, although there are also numerous sub-categories of braces that are prescribed depending upon the underlying condition, the amount of stability desired or the intended use of the brace.

    Elbow: Support
    A forearm support bandage, worn just below the elbow, can provide relief from pain. It reduces stress on inflamed or damaged tissues lying above the brace. The elbow support (brace) is not meant to be place directly on the inflamed area. It is designed to be just below to the area so as to relieve the injured portion so that it may heal. In addition, an elbow brace may help relieve swelling. But it is not a panacea and should not take the place of a good exercise therapy program to promote healing.

    Most doctors can fit you with an elbow brace. It's wise to consult your doctor before you buy a brace from a pharmacy or other store. Wearing the wrong kind of brace or wrapping a brace in the wrong way can lead to further injury.

    Hand/Wrist Splints
    Splints are frequently used in the treatment and rehabilitation of wrist and hand injuries. Today's splints are lightweight and typically molded from aluminum or thermoplastic. They often have internal padding at sites of potential friction or pressure, and adjustable Velcro fasteners. These splints immobilize and support the wrist or hand, protect it from further injury and prevent distortions that can occur during healing. Splints are often tailored to the size and shape of a person's hand and to the underlying type of injury, so it's unwise to use a generic splint or another person's splint without first checking with your doctor.

    Knee: Compression Sleeves
    Knee compression sleeves give added support, increasing stability and helping to reduce swelling in an injured knee. Patients that have light sprains may be directed to use a compression sleeve during the early stages of rehabilitation. Other patients that have ongoing knee problems or chronic conditions may be recommended to use a sleeve on a daily basis. These sleeves are less restricting than most other knee supports and can be worn under loose fitting clothing.

    Knee compression sleeves can be used to treat:

  • Light swelling.
  • Light knee strains.
  • Chronic inflammation.
  • Degenerative joint disease.

  • Knee: Ligament Brace
    Functional braces are designed to control abnormal motion of an unstable knee. Because ligaments help stabilize the knee, and a torn ligament leads to instability, these braces are also called Ligament Braces. The intent is to allow a previously injured athlete to compete at a higher level than they would otherwise be able to without the brace. The brace is designed to support either a newly reconstructed ligament such as the ACL, or a weakened or injured ligament, which is being treated in a conservative manner. The role of a functional brace is to increase stability to a previously injured knee.

    Type of Injuries:

  • Pre-operative ACL/PCL ruptures/injuries
  • Non-surgical ACL/PCL injuries
  • General knee instability
  • Pre/post joint replacement with ligament instability.

  • Knee: Patellar Supports
    Patella tracking supports are used to maintain the kneecap in its proper position while the knee is in motion. Patients that have a poorly tracking or misaligned kneecap will usually be directed to wear a support to prevent the kneecap from dislodging from the femural groove. Pressure applied by the support is adjustable, allowing changes to the support according to the condition of the knee. The support fits firmly around the knee with pressure to each side of the kneecap. Construction of the support is thin and elastic, which allows for easy movement and enables the support to be worn under loose fitting clothing.

    Patella tracking supports can be used to treat:

  • Patellar malalignment
  • Patellar dislocation
  • Patellar instability
  • Anterior knee pain
  • Knee: Patellar Tendon Brace
    Patellar Tendon Braces are designed to provide stress relief to the patellar tendon. Patellar tendonitis is an inflammation of the patellar tendon, usually at the insertion site where the patellar tendon attaches to the tibia. These braces apply pressure over the patellar tendon just above or proximal to the insertion site. By applying pressure above the area where the tendon attaches to the tibia, the end point for the tendon is changed. This new end point now bears the stress of the patellar tendon during activity. This allows the inflamed insertion site to rest.

    Patellar Tendonitis is common among jumpers because of the stress that is applied to the tendon during this activity. Patients that have patellar tendonitis may be directed to wear a brace to allow the tendon to rest during activity. The role of a patellar tendon brace is to relieve the stress placed on the patellar tendon and its insertion site during activity.

    Knee: Post-Operative Brace
    Post-Operative Braces are a type of rehabilitation braces which are designed to minimize motion during the early period after knee surgery or a knee injury. During this time, the knee is attempting to heal and undesired motion could be harmful. The role of a rehabilitative brace is temporary motion control.

    Rehabilitation braces are available in two designs: The first is a foam brace with stays and straps that positions the knee in an extended position. This knee immobilizer keeps the knee "immobilized" while it heals. A post-operative brace is designed with cuffs, which are usually made of a soft material that cover both the upper and lower leg. The cuffs have metal uprights attached to both sides of the leg. The brace is hinged with some type of flexion and extension stop, which will limit how far the knee can bend and straighten. This allows the physician to control the amount of motion the leg can travel through. This limitation of motion protects the knee and leg from movement that could be harmful during the recovery period.

    Type of Injuries: Knee Immobilizers and Post-Operative Hinged Braces are used to treat knee injuries, with a focus on the ligaments of the knee or other severe injuries to the soft tissue of the leg.

    Knee: Support
    A knee support is a sleeve-like support that fits firmly around the knee. The support is used to reinforce the joint during motion and provide compression to aid healing and reduce pain and swelling. Patients suffering from knee strains or inflammation will usually be directed to use a support during daily activities.

    The thin and flexible construction of the support allows for normal movement of the knee and also allows the support to be worn under loose fitting clothing. To prevent harmful pressure to certain structures, the support applies differing compression around the knee. The sides of the joint receive intermittent pressure to help stimulate blood flow while the rear of the support fits relatively loose to prevent constriction of circulation. The kneecap is aided in positioning, but remains free of compression to allow its natural movement.

    Knee supports can be used to treat:

  • Strains
  • Sprains
  • Inflammation
  • Chondromalacia patella
  • Lumbar: Supports
    A bad back can often be the result of poor posture and positioning. A lumbosacral back support, when properly fitted and positioned, will help to maintain a proper, stable posture when sitting at a chair or driving in the car. Poor posture while sitting forces the spine out of its proper position and puts a significant strain on the muscles, tendons and ligaments that support the spine. Lumbar supports can be found in a wide range of sizes and styles.

    Orthotics
    An orthotic insert fits inside a shoe and helps position the foot in an anatomically correct position while walking, running, or jumping. Frequently, abnormal foot motion and gait occurs as a result of over-pronation of the foot; most orthotics are used to treat this condition. Over-pronation is a tendency to roll the foot onto the inner edge, loading the inside of the foot and leaving the outer edge almost weightless. A professionally made orthotic insert will exactly contour to the bottom of the foot, and can compensate for over-pronation or other abnormal foot mechanics.

    One of two construction methods may be used to create an orthotic; one utilizes a plaster mold of the entire foot to make a moderately rigid insert, the other utilizes a foam impression of the bottom of the foot, creating a more flexible insert. In either case, the finished product must be tilted with small wedges, while other accommodations are made to protect sensitive areas of the foot. The choice of orthotics and design will vary according to the expected use, foot type, and body weight.

    Orthotics can be used to treat:

  • abnormal foot mechanics
  • patella dislocation or maltracking
  • patellar tendonitis
  • general knee pain
  • ankle instability

  • Shoulder: Immobilizer
    A shoulder immobilizer is indicated when the shoulder has sustained an injury that requires the joint to remain as immobile as possible while healing takes place. The shoulder immobilizer functions by supporting the arm in a position next to the chest of neutral rotation, referred to as the plane of the scapula. The unique sling design features an easy open wrist cuff to allow active motion at the elbow while continuing to keep the shoulder joint from moving.

    The benefits of a shoulder immobilizer include:
  • Minimizes motion of and supports the shoulder
  • Allows for elbow exercises

  • Wraps
    There are hundreds of products available to immobilize and protect the foot and ankle. The materials range from space-age plastics to old-fashioned bandaging, with prices varying accordingly. For best results, use these products in consultation with a health care professional.

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